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Food-chain transfer of zinc from contaminated Urtica dioica and Acer pseudoplatanus L. to Microlophium carnosum and Drepanosiphum platanoidis Schrank

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Sinnet, D., Hutchings, T.R. and Hodson, M. E. (2010) Food-chain transfer of zinc from contaminated Urtica dioica and Acer pseudoplatanus L. to Microlophium carnosum and Drepanosiphum platanoidis Schrank. Environmental Pollution, 158 (1). pp. 267-271. ISSN 0269-7491

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1016/j.envpol.2009.07.008

Abstract/Summary

This study examines the food-chain transfer of Zn from two plant species, Urtica dioica (stinging nettle) and Acer pseudoplatanus (sycamore maple), into their corresponding aphid species, Microlophium carnosum and Drepanosiphum platanoidis. The plants were grown in a hydroponic system using solutions with increasing concentrations of Zn from 0.02 to 41.9 mg Zn/l. Above-ground tissue concentrations in U. dioica and M. carnosum increased with increasing Zn exposure (p < 0.001). Zn concentrations in A. pseudoplatanus also increased with solution concentration from the control to the 9.8 mg Zn/l solution, above which concentrations remained constant. Zn concentrations in both D. platanoidis and the phloem tissue of A. pseudoplatanus were not affected by the Zn concentration in the watering solution. It appears that A. pseudoplatanus was able to limit Zn transport in the phloem, resulting in constant Zn exposure to the aphids. Zn concentrations in D. platanoidis were around three times those in M. carnosum. Concentrations of Zn in two aphid species are dependant on species and exposure.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Geography and Environmental Science
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Earth Systems Science
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Earth Systems Science
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Soil Research Centre
ID Code:1683
Uncontrolled Keywords:Stinging nettle; Sycamore maple; Common nettle aphid; Sycamore aphid; Contaminated land
Publisher:Elsevier

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