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Cannabidiol displays antiepileptiform and antiseizure properties in vitro and in vivo

Jones, N. A., Hill, A. J., Smith, I., Bevan, S. A., Williams, C. M., Whalley, B. J. and Stephens, G. J. (2010) Cannabidiol displays antiepileptiform and antiseizure properties in vitro and in vivo. Journal of Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics, 332 (2). pp. 569-577. ISSN 0022-3565

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1124/jpet.109.159145

Abstract/Summary

Plant-derived cannabinoids (phytocannabinoids) are compounds with emerging therapeutic potential. Early studies suggested that cannabidiol (CBD) has anticonvulsant properties in animal models and reduced seizure frequency in limited human trials. Here, we examine the anti-epileptiform and anti-seizure potential of CBD using in vitro electrophysiology and an in vivo animal seizure model, respectively. CBD (0.01-100 muM) effects were assessed in vitro using the Mg(2+)-free and 4-aminopyridine (4-AP) models of status epilepticus-like epileptiform activity in hippocampal brain slices via multi-electrode array (MEA) recordings. In the Mg(2+)-free model, CBD decreased epileptiform local field potential (LFP) burst amplitude (in CA1 and dentate gyrus (DG) regions) and burst duration (in all regions) and increased burst frequency (in all regions). In the 4-AP model, CBD decreased LFP burst amplitude (in CA1, only at 100 muM CBD), burst duration (in CA3 and DG), and burst frequency (in all regions). CBD (1, 10 and 100 mg/kg) effects were also examined in vivo using the pentylenetetrazole (PTZ) model of generalised seizures. CBD (100 mg/kg) exerted clear anticonvulsant effects with significant decreases in incidence of severe seizures and mortality in comparison to vehicle-treated animals. Finally, CBD acted with only low affinity at cannabinoid CB(1) receptors and displayed no agonist activity in [(35)S]GTPgammaS assays in cortical membranes. These findings suggest that CBD acts to inhibit epileptiform activity in vitro and seizure severity in vivo. Thus, we demonstrate the potential of CBD as a novel anti-epileptic drug (AED) in the unmet clinical need associated with generalised seizures.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > School of Pharmacy > Division of Pharmacology
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Integrative Neuroscience and Neurodynamics (CINN)
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Neuroscience
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Nutrition and Health
ID Code:1718
Publisher:American Society for Pharmacology and Experimental Therapeutics

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