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Contested and contesting identities: minority languages vs. the teaching of 'world' languages within the global cultural economy

Rassool, N. (2000) Contested and contesting identities: minority languages vs. the teaching of 'world' languages within the global cultural economy. Journal of Multilingualism and Multicultural Development, 21 (6). pp. 386-398. ISSN 1747-7557

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1080/01434630008666412

Abstract/Summary

This paper juxtaposes postmodernist discourses on language, identity and cultural power with historical forms of language inequalities grounded in the nation-state. The discussion is presented in three sections. The first section focuses on the mixed legacies of language-state relations within the pluralist nation-state, colonial and postcolonial language policies. The second section examines the concept of linguistic minority rights beyond the nation-state. This incorporates discussion of transmigration, the breaking up of previous power blocs in Eastern Europe and the role of language in the articulation of emergent 'ethnic' nationalisms. The third section examines the concept of multilingualism within the interactive cultural landscape defined by 'informationalism'. Discussing the collective impact of these variables on the shaping of new cultural, economic and political inequalities, the paper highlights the tensions in which the concept of linguistic minority rights exists in the world today.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > Institute of Education > Language and Literacy > Second Language Research Group
ID Code:26659
Publisher:Taylor and Francis

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