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Is optical imaging spectroscopy a viable measurement technique for the investigation of the negative BOLD phenomenon? A concurrent optical imaging spectroscopy and fMRI study at high field (7T)

Kennerley, A. J., Mayhew, J. E., Boorman, L., Zheng, Y. and Berwick, J. (2012) Is optical imaging spectroscopy a viable measurement technique for the investigation of the negative BOLD phenomenon? A concurrent optical imaging spectroscopy and fMRI study at high field (7T). NeuroImage, 61 (1). pp. 10-20. ISSN 1053-8119

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.neuroimage.2012.03.015

Abstract/Summary

Traditionally functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) has been used to map activity in the human brain by measuring increases in the Blood Oxygenation Level Dependent (BOLD) signal. Often accompanying positive BOLD fMRI signal changes are sustained negative signal changes. Previous studies investigating the neurovascular coupling mechanisms of the negative BOLD phenomenon have used concurrent 2D-optical imaging spectroscopy (2D-OIS) and electrophysiology (Boorman et al., 2010). These experiments suggested that the negative BOLD signal in response to whisker stimulation was a result of an increase in deoxy-haemoglobin and reduced multi-unit activity in the deep cortical layers. However, Boorman et al. (2010) did not measure the BOLD and haemodynamic response concurrently and so could not quantitatively compare either the spatial maps or the 2D-OIS and fMRI time series directly. Furthermore their study utilised a homogeneous tissue model in which is predominantly sensitive to haemodynamic changes in more superficial layers. Here we test whether the 2D-OIS technique is appropriate for studies of negative BOLD. We used concurrent fMRI with 2D-OIS techniques for the investigation of the haemodynamics underlying the negative BOLD at 7 Tesla. We investigated whether optical methods could be used to accurately map and measure the negative BOLD phenomenon by using 2D-OIS haemodynamic data to derive predictions from a biophysical model of BOLD signal changes. We showed that despite the deep cortical origin of the negative BOLD response, if an appropriate heterogeneous tissue model is used in the spectroscopic analysis then 2D-OIS can be used to investigate the negative BOLD phenomenon.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences > Department of Bio-Engineering
ID Code:33472
Uncontrolled Keywords:fMRI; Optical imaging; Haemodynamics; Negative BOLD; Biophysical modelling
Publisher:Elsevier

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