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The climate and environment of Byzantine Anatolia: integrating science, history, and archaeology

Haldon, J., Roberts, N., Izdebski, A., Fleitmann, D., McCormick, M., Cassis, M., Doonan, O., Eastwood, W., Elton, H., Ladstätter, S., Manning, S., Newhard, J., Nichol, K., Telelis, I. and Xoplaki, E. (2014) The climate and environment of Byzantine Anatolia: integrating science, history, and archaeology. Journal fo Interdisciplinary History, 45 (2). pp. 113-161. ISSN 0022-1953

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1162/JINH_a_00682

Abstract/Summary

The integration of high-resolution archaeological, textual, and environmental data with longer-term, low-resolution data affords greater precision in identifying some of the causal relationships underlying societal change. Regional and microregional case studies about the Byzantine world—in particular, Anatolia, which for several centuries was the heart of that world—reveal many of the difficulties that researchers face when attempting to assess the influence of environmental factors on human society. The Anatolian case challenges a number of assumptions about the impact of climatic factors on socio-political organization and medium-term historical evolution, highlighting the importance of further collaboration between historians, archaeologists, and climate scientists.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Scientific Archaeology
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Archaeology
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Past Climate Change
ID Code:40232
Publisher:MIT Press

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