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Illicit speech, unsayable bodies, and eighteenth-century medievalism: 'Nocrion: conte allobroge'

Leglu, C. (2018) Illicit speech, unsayable bodies, and eighteenth-century medievalism: 'Nocrion: conte allobroge'. Forum for Modern Language Studies. ISSN 1471-6860 (In Press)

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Abstract/Summary

The eighteenth-century short story Nocrion is an adaptation of an Old French fabliau that explores illicit speech. In particular it plays variations on the indirect naming of things considered to be obscene, through a range of strategies: antiquarianism, euphemism, and other languages. One of its presumed authors, the Comte de Caylus, innovated in his fidelity to his medieval sources, while adapting the text to serve the concerns of his readers.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > Graduate Centre for Medieval Studies (GCMS)
Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > School of Literature and Languages > Modern Languages and European Studies > French
ID Code:66964
Publisher:Oxford University Press

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