Accessibility navigation


Encapsulation of Bifidobacterium longum in alginate-dairy matrices and survival in simulated gastrointestinal conditions, refrigeration, cow milk and goat milk

Prasanna, P. H. P. and Charalampopoulos, D. (2018) Encapsulation of Bifidobacterium longum in alginate-dairy matrices and survival in simulated gastrointestinal conditions, refrigeration, cow milk and goat milk. Food Bioscience, 21. pp. 72-79. ISSN 2212-4292

[img]
Preview
Text - Accepted Version
· Available under License Creative Commons Attribution Non-commercial No Derivatives.
· Please see our End User Agreement before downloading.

922kB

It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work. See Guidance on citing.

To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.fbio.2017.12.002

Abstract/Summary

The aim of this study was to microencapsulate Bifidobacterium longum subsp. infantis CCUG 52486 using the extrusion method in a variety of matrices, namely sodium alginate (SA), sodium alginate-cow milk (SACM), sodium alginate-goat milk (SAGM) and sodium alginate-casein hydrolysate (SACH), and to evaluate the survival of free and encapsulated bacterial cells under different conditions. The encapsulation yield, size and surface morphology of the microcapsules were evaluated. The survival of microencapsulated bacterial cells and free bacterial cells were evaluated under simulated gastrointestinal conditions as well as in refrigeration, cow milk and goat milk during storage at 4 oC for 28 days. The average size of SACM capsules and SAGM capsules was 2.8±0.3 mm and 3.1±0.2 mm respectively. Goat milk and cow milk based matrices resulted in dense microcapsules which led to better performances in simulated gastrointestinal conditions than SA and SACH microcapsules. The bacterial cells encapsulated in SAGM showed the highest survival rate in cow milk (7.61 log cfu g-1) and goat milk (8.10 log cfu g-1) after the storage of 28 d. The cells encapsulated in SA and SACH and the free cells performed poorly under the simulated gastrointestinal conditions and in all different storage conditions. This study showed that SACM and SAGM are suitable to encapsulate B. longum subsp. infantis CCUG 52486 using the extrusion technique and more specifically, SAGM has a potential to be used as a new encapsulation material for encapsulating probiotic bacteria, resulting milk and goat milk-based products with higher probiotic cell concentrations during refrigerated storage.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Chemical Analysis Facility (CAF) > Electron Microscopy Laboratory (CAF)
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Chemistry, Food and Pharmacy > Department of Food and Nutritional Sciences > Food Research Group
ID Code:74692
Publisher:Elsevier

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation