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System of crop intensification for more productive, resource-conserving, climate-resilient, and sustainable agriculture: experience with diverse crops in varying agroecologies

Adhikari, P., Araya, H., Aruna, G., Balamatti, A., Banerjee, S., Baskaran, P., Barah, B. C., Behera, D., Berhe, T., Boruah, P., Dhar, S., Edwards, S., Fulford, M., Gujja, B., Ibrahim, H., Kabir, H., Kassam, A., Khadka, R. B., Koma, Y. S., Natarajan, U. S. , Perez, R., Sen, D., Sharif, A., Singh, G., Styger, E., Thakur, A. K., Tiwari, A., Uphoff, N. and Verma, A. (2018) System of crop intensification for more productive, resource-conserving, climate-resilient, and sustainable agriculture: experience with diverse crops in varying agroecologies. International Journal of Agricultural Sustainability, 16 (1). pp. 1-28. ISSN 1747-762X

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1080/14735903.2017.1402504

Abstract/Summary

With continually increasing demand for food accompanied by the constraints of climate change and the availability and quality of soil and water, the world’s farmers are challenged to produce more food per hectare with less water, and with fewer agrochemical inputs if possible. The ideas and methods of the system of rice intensification which is improving irrigated rice production are now being extended/adapted to many other crops: wheat, maize, finger millet, sugarcane, tef, mustard, legumes, vegetables, and even spices. Promoting better root growth and enhancing the soil’s fertility with organic materials are being found effective means for raising the yields of many crop plants with less water, less fertilizer, reduced seeds, fewer agrochemicals, and greater climate resilience. In this article, we review what is becoming known about various farmer-centred innovations for agroecological crop management that can contribute to agricultural sustainability. These changes represent the emerging system of crop intensification, which is being increasingly applied in Asian, African, and Latin American countries. More research will be needed to verify the efficacy and impact of these innovations and to clarify their conditions and limits. But as no negative effects for human or environmental health have been identified, making these agronomic options more widely known should prompt more investigation and, to the extent justified by results, utilization of these methodologies.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development
ID Code:79023
Uncontrolled Keywords:Agronomy and Crop Science, Economics and Econometrics
Publisher:Informa UK Limited

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