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Chapter 26: the temporal dynamics of emotional responding: implications for well-being and health from the MIDUS

Schaefer, S. M., Van Reekum, C. M., Lapate, R. C., Heller, A. S., Grupe, D. W. and Davidson, R. J. (2018) Chapter 26: the temporal dynamics of emotional responding: implications for well-being and health from the MIDUS. In: Ryff, C. D. and Krueger, R. F. (eds.) The Oxford Handbook of Integrative Health Science. Oxford Library of Psychology, p. 355. ISBN 9780190676384 (In Press)

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Abstract/Summary

In this chapter findings are reviewed from the MIDUS Neuroscience Project that underscore the value in examining the temporal dynamics of responses to brief emotional provocation for understanding linkages among emotions and factors contributing to health and well-being across the MIDUS study. This rich dataset has allowed the exploration of associations between individual differences in the affective chronometry of negative and positive emotional responses in vulnerable vs. resilient profiles. Findings from functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) as well as electromyographic recordings (EMG) of the facial muscles to objectively measure emotional responses demonstrate that the temporal dynamics of emotional responses to affective stimuli are associated with aging, personality, psychopathology, stress exposure, biomarkers, and well-being. Overall, these findings suggest that variation in health and well-being are differentially predicted by specific temporal parameters of the emotional response, such as the magnitude of the immediate response to the presence of a stimulus (i.e., reactivity), residual activity and its duration after stimulus offset (i.e., recovery), as well as the change in response – or habituation - across repeated presentations of similarly-valenced stimuli. Besides the seemingly obvious import of recovering quickly from negative or unpleasant provocations, the chronometry of positive emotional responses appears to be particularly vital for determining how emotional processes may take a physiological toll or promote resiliency in the face of stress and disease. By examining such temporal dynamics in response to affective stimuli in MIDUS, a better understanding of the brain-behavior associations underlying emotion, and how emotions “get under the skin” to impact well-being and health across the lifespan is gained.

Item Type:Book or Report Section
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Integrative Neuroscience and Neurodynamics (CINN)
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Ageing
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Psychopathology and Affective Neuroscience
ID Code:79080
Publisher:Oxford Library of Psychology

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