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The effects of desiccation on broad‐leaved dock (Rumex obtusifolius) and curled dock (Rumex crispus) root fragment regeneration

Alshallash, K. S. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0001-5862-8392 and Hatcher, P. E. (2020) The effects of desiccation on broad‐leaved dock (Rumex obtusifolius) and curled dock (Rumex crispus) root fragment regeneration. Weed Biology and Management, 20 (2). pp. 47-60. ISSN 1444-6162

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1111/wbm.12199

Abstract/Summary

Fresh root fragments of Rumex crispus and Rumex obtusifolius , which initially contain 65–70% moisture, progressively lose moisture when desiccated under conditions matching summer weather in southeast England. The likelihood of shoot emergence and the time it took in glasshouse conditions were both affected by desiccation, with R. crispus the most affected up to 48 hr and R. obtusifolius slower to emerge after 48 hr. These effects converged after longer desiccation periods, and R. crispus entirely failed to emerge after 120 hr. The dry weight of emerged shoots was not significantly different between the species until they were desiccated for 96 hr, after which R. obtusifolius dry weight was significantly reduced. In outdoor trials, desiccation for 24 or 48 hr had a lesser effect on emergence in either species when fragments were planted at the soil surface or at up to a depth of 10 cm, compared to deeper plantings, but emergence was significantly lower in plantings at 15 or 20 cm. Emergence delays were not significantly different between the species until they were planted at 15 or 20 cm, when R. obtusifolius was slower to emerge than R. crispus , an effect exacerbated by increasing desiccation. Similar interactions of increasing soil depth and desiccation were found in reductions in dry weight, number of tillers and leaf area, with R. obtusifolius generally, but not exclusively, better able to withstand more extreme trial conditions. Our findings suggest that control of these highly troublesome weeds can be assisted by appropriate agricultural practices, notably exposing cut fragments to drying conditions followed by deep burial.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences > Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
ID Code:92170
Publisher:Wiley

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