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Can early change in eating disorder psychopathology predict outcome in guided self-help for binge eating?

Jenkins, P. E. ORCID: https://orcid.org/0000-0003-1673-2903, Smith, L. and Morgan, C. (2020) Can early change in eating disorder psychopathology predict outcome in guided self-help for binge eating? Eating and Weight Disorders-Studies on Anorexia Bulimia and Obesity. ISSN 1124-4909

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1007/s40519-020-01059-3

Abstract/Summary

Purpose: This study tests the value of a measure of eating disorder (ED) psychopathology in predicting outcome following guided self-help in a non-underweight sample with regular binge eating. It examines whether early reductions in ED psychopathology are associated with remission status at post-treatment. Methods: Seventy-two adults with bulimia nervosa, binge-eating disorder, or an atypical form of these illnesses received up to ten sessions of cognitive behaviour therapy-based guided self-help. Using a session-by-session measure of eating pathology and associated reliable change indices, response was analysed using receiver operating characteristic analysis to predict outcomes at post-treatment. Results: In this routine care setting, nearly one-quarter of the sample achieved remission following GSH, approximately two-thirds of whom showed early change in ED psychopathology. Early change prior to Session 6 was accurate in predicting later remission. Individuals showing early change did not differ from others on baseline characteristics or rates of attrition. Conclusion: Data suggest that a majority of those who respond to treatment will do so before the second half of treatment, information that could be used to ensure that evidence-based treatments are used as effectively as possible.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Department of Psychology
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Psychology and Clinical Language Sciences > Psychopathology and Affective Neuroscience
ID Code:93570
Publisher:Springer

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