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The population genetic structure of clonal organisms generated by exponentially bounded and fat-tailed dispersal

Wingen, L. U., Brown, J. K. M. and Shaw, M. W. (2007) The population genetic structure of clonal organisms generated by exponentially bounded and fat-tailed dispersal. Genetics, 177 (1). pp. 435-448. ISSN 0016-6731

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1534/genetics.107.077206

Abstract/Summary

Long distance dispersal (LDD) plays an important role in many population processes like colonization, range expansion, and epidemics. LDD of small particles like fungal spores is often a result of turbulent wind dispersal and is best described by functions with power-law behavior in the tails ("fat tailed"). The influence of fat-tailed LDD on population genetic structure is reported in this article. In computer simulations, the population structure generated by power-law dispersal with exponents in the range of -2 to -1, in distinct contrast to that generated by exponential dispersal, has a fractal structure. As the power-law exponent becomes smaller, the distribution of individual genotypes becomes more self-similar at different scales. Common statistics like G(ST) are not well suited to summarizing differences between the population genetic structures. Instead, fractal and self-similarity statistics demonstrated differences in structure arising from fat-tailed and exponential dispersal. When dispersal is fat tailed, a log-log plot of the Simpson index against distance between subpopulations has an approximately constant gradient over a large range of spatial scales. The fractal dimension D-2 is linearly inversely related to the power-law exponent, with a slope of similar to -2. In a large simulation arena, fat-tailed LDD allows colonization of the entire space by all genotypes whereas exponentially bounded dispersal eventually confines all descendants of a single clonal lineage to a relatively small area.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences
ID Code:10117
Uncontrolled Keywords:DISTANCE SEED DISPERSAL, ERYSIPHE-GRAMINIS CONIDIA, PLANT-DISEASE, SPORE DISPERSAL, POLLEN DISPERSAL, AERIAL DISPERSAL, SPATIAL-PATTERN, RISK-ASSESSMENT, OILSEED RAPE, FOREST TREES

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