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Using phylogeny to investigate the origins of the Cape flora: the importance of taxonomic, gene and genome sampling strategies

Hawkins, J. A. (2006) Using phylogeny to investigate the origins of the Cape flora: the importance of taxonomic, gene and genome sampling strategies. Diversity and Distributions, 12 (1). pp. 27-33. ISSN 1366-9516

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1111/j.1366-9516.2006.00209.x

Abstract/Summary

Phylogenetic methods hold great promise for the reconstruction of the transition from precursor to modern flora and the identification of underlying factors which drive the process. The phylogenetic methods presently used to address the question of the origin of the Cape flora of South Africa are considered here. The sampling requirements of each of these methods, which include dating of diversifications using calibrated molecular trees, sister pair comparisons, lineage through time plots and biogeographical optimizations are reviewed. Sampling of genes, genomes and species are considered. Although increased higher-level studies and increased sampling are required for robust interpretation, it is clear that much progress is already made. It is argued that despite the remarkable richness of the flora, the Cape flora is a valuable model system to demonstrate the utility of phylogenetic methods in determining the history of a modern flora.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences
ID Code:10164
Uncontrolled Keywords:Cape flora, model system, phylogeny, sampling, South Africa, MOLECULAR SYSTEMATICS, DIVERSIFICATION RATES, DNA REGIONS, RADIATION, EVOLUTION, PLANTS, TEMPO, RECONSTRUCTION, RESTIONACEAE, BIOGEOGRAPHY

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