Accessibility navigation


Microgemma vivaresi n. sp (Microsporidia, Tetramicridae), infecting liver and skeletal muscle of sea scorpions, Taurulus bubalis (Euphrasen 1786) (Osteichthyes, Cottidae), an inshore, littoral fish

Canning, E. U., Feist, S. W., Longshaw, M., Okamura, B., Anderson, C. L., Tse, M. T. and Curry, A. (2005) Microgemma vivaresi n. sp (Microsporidia, Tetramicridae), infecting liver and skeletal muscle of sea scorpions, Taurulus bubalis (Euphrasen 1786) (Osteichthyes, Cottidae), an inshore, littoral fish. Journal of Eukaryotic Microbiology, 52 (2). pp. 123-131. ISSN 1066-5234

Full text not archived in this repository.

It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work. See Guidance on citing.

Abstract/Summary

The ultrastructure of a new microsporidian species Microgemmia vivaresi n. sp. causing liver cell xenoma formation in sea scorpions, Taurulus bubalis, is described. Stages of merogony, sporogony, and sporogenesis are mixed in the central cytoplasm of developing xenomas. All stages have unpaired nuclei. Uninucleate and multinucleate meronts lie within vacuoles formed from host endoplasmic reticulum and divide by binary or multiple fission. Sporonts, no longer in vacuoles, deposit plaques of surface coat on the plasma membrane that cause the surface to pucker. Division occurs at the Puckered stage into sporoblast mother cells, on which plaques join up to complete the surface coat. A final binary fission gives rise to sporoblasts. A dense globule, thought to be involved in polar tube synthesis, is gradually dispersed during spore maturation. Spores are broadly ovoid, have a large posterior vacuole, and measure 3.6 mu m x 2.1 pint (fresh). The polar tube has a short wide anterior section that constricts abruptly, then runs posteriad to coil about eight times around the posterior vacuole with granular contents. The polaroplast has up to 40 membranes arranged in pairs mostly attached to the wide region of the polar tube and directed posteriorty around a cytoplasm of a coarsely granular appearance. The species is placed alongside the type species Microgemmia hepaticus Ralphs and Matthews 1986 within the family Tetramicridae, which is transferred from the class Dihaplophasea to the class Haplophasea, as there is no evidence for the occurrence of a diplokaryotic phase.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences
ID Code:10290
Uncontrolled Keywords:merogony, microsporidia, new species, spores, sporogony, ultrastructure, xenoma, PHYLUM MICROSPORA, REDESCRIPTION, THELOHAN, NOV

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation