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Recent developments in genetic data analysis: what can they tell us about human demographic history?

Beaumont, M. A. (2004) Recent developments in genetic data analysis: what can they tell us about human demographic history? Heredity, 92 (5). pp. 365-379. ISSN 0018-067X

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1038/sj.hdy.6800447

Abstract/Summary

Over the last decade, a number of new methods of population genetic analysis based on likelihood have been introduced. This review describes and explains the general statistical techniques that have recently been used, and discusses the underlying population genetic models. Experimental papers that use these methods to infer human demographic and phylogeographic history are reviewed. It appears that the use of likelihood has hitherto had little impact in the field of human population genetics, which is still primarily driven by more traditional approaches. However, with the current uncertainty about the effects of natural selection, population structure and ascertainment of single-nucleotide polymorphism markers, it is suggested that likelihood-based methods may have a greater impact in the future.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences
ID Code:10428
Uncontrolled Keywords:human evolution, coalescent, likelihood, population structure, admixture, population growth, MAXIMUM-LIKELIHOOD-ESTIMATION, SINGLE-NUCLEOTIDE POLYMORPHISMS, EFFECTIVE POPULATION-SIZE, MULTILOCUS GENOTYPE DATA, CHAIN MONTE-CARLO, HIERARCHICAL BAYESIAN MODEL, TEMPORALLY SPACED SAMPLES, HUMAN, Y-CHROMOSOMES, LINKAGE DISEQUILIBRIUM, RECOMBINATION RATES

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