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Rooting cuttings of Syringa vulgaris cv. Charles Joly and Corylus avellana cv. Aurea: the influence of stock plant pruning and shoot growth

Cameron, R.W.F. , Harrison-Murray, R.S., Fordham, M., Judd, H., Ford, Y.Y., Marks, T.R. and Edmondson, R. (2003) Rooting cuttings of Syringa vulgaris cv. Charles Joly and Corylus avellana cv. Aurea: the influence of stock plant pruning and shoot growth. Trees: Structure and Function, 17 (5). pp. 451-462. ISSN 0931-1890

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1007/s00468-003-0255-1

Abstract/Summary

The relationship between shoot growth and rooting was examined in two, 'difficult-to root' amenity trees, Syringa vulgaris L. cv. Charles Joly and Corylus avellana L. cv. Aurea. A range of treatments reflecting severity of pruning was imposed on field-grown stock prior to bud break. To minimise variation due to the numbers of buds that developed under different treatments, bud number was restricted to 30 per plant. Leafy cuttings were harvested at different stages of the active growth phase of each species. With Syringa, rooting decreased with later harvests, but loss of rooting potential was delayed in cuttings collected from the most severe pruning treatment. Rooting potential was associated with the extent of post-excision shoot growth on the cutting but regression analyses indicated that this relationship could not entirely explain the loss of rooting with time, nor the effects due to pruning. Similarly, in Corylus rooting was promoted by severe pruning, but the relationship between apical growth on the cutting and rooting was weaker than in Syringa, and only at the last harvest did growth play a critical role in determining rooting. Another unusual factor of the last harvest of Corylus was a bimodal distribution of roots per cutting, with very few rooted cuttings having less than five roots. This implies that, for this harvest at least, the potential of an individual cutting to root is probably not limited by the number of potential rooting sites.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences
ID Code:10699

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