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Orphan worms and, homeless parasites enhance bilaterian diversity

Okamura, B. and Canning, E. U. (2003) Orphan worms and, homeless parasites enhance bilaterian diversity. Trends in Ecology & Evolution, 18 (12). pp. 633-639. ISSN 0169-5347

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.tree.2003.09.017

Abstract/Summary

Microscopic endoparasites belonging to the Phylum Myxozoa provide a striking example of how much there is still to be learned about the diversity of the Metazoa. Recent research on myxozoans has provided new insights into evolution within the Bilateria, revealing unparalleled levels of morphological simplification associated with parasitism, a home for an orphan worm, and a hypothesis of the endosymbiotic origin(s) for extrusible intracellular organelles in myxozoans and cnidarians. In addition, discovery of the source of a devastating disease of salmonid fish has enabled researchers to identify two ancient clades within the Myxozoa, and has exposed new mysteries concerning myxozoan life-cycle evolution and evolutionary diversification. This plethora of new insights exemplifies the fundamental value of studying obscure organisms.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences
ID Code:10834
Uncontrolled Keywords:PROLIFERATIVE KIDNEY-DISEASE, DNA-SEQUENCE ANALYSIS, TO-FISH, TRANSMISSION, 18S RDNA SEQUENCES, TETRACAPSULA-BRYOSALMONAE, PHYLOGENETIC POSITION, ANCIENT ORIGIN, PHYLUM MYXOZOA, LIFE-CYCLE, EVOLUTION

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