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An experimental comparison between rival theories of rapid automatized naming performance and its relationship to reading

Stainthorp, R., Stuart, M. , Garwood, H., Powell, D. and Quinlan, P. (2007) An experimental comparison between rival theories of rapid automatized naming performance and its relationship to reading. Journal of Experimental Child Psychology, 98 (1). pp. 46-68. ISSN 0022-0965

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1016/j.jecp.2007.04.003

Abstract/Summary

Two studies investigated the degree to which the relationship between rapid automatized naming (RAN) performance and reading development is driven by shared phonological processes. Study 1 assessed RAN, phonological awareness, and reading performance in 1010 7- to -10 year-olds. Results showed that RAN deficits occurred in the absence of phonological awareness deficits. These were accompanied by modest reading delays. In structural equation modeling, solutions where RAN was subsumed within a phonological processing factor did not provide a good fit to the data, suggesting that processes outside phonology may drive RAN performance and its association with reading. Study 2 investigated Kail’s proposal that speed of processing underlies this relationship. Children with single RAN deficits showed slower speed of processing than did closely matched controls performing normally on RAN. However, regression analysis revealed that RAN made a unique contribution to reading even after accounting for processing speed. Theoretical implications are discussed.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > Institute of Education
ID Code:12641
Uncontrolled Keywords:reading development, visual word recognition, rapid automatized naming, phonological processes, speed of processing

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