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The influence of organic acids in relation to acid deposition in controlling the acidity of soil and stream waters on a seasonal basis

Chapman, P. J., Clark, J. M., Reynolds, B. and Adamson, J. K. (2008) The influence of organic acids in relation to acid deposition in controlling the acidity of soil and stream waters on a seasonal basis. Environmental Pollution, 151 (1). pp. 110-120. ISSN 0269-7491

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1016/j.envpol.2007.03.001

Abstract/Summary

Much uncertainty still exists regarding the relative importance of organic acids in relation to acid deposition in controlling the acidity of soil and surface waters. This paper contributes to this debate by presenting analysis of seasonal variations in atmospheric deposition, soil solution and stream water chemistry for two UK headwater catchments with contrasting soils. Acid neutralising capacity (ANC), dissolved organic carbon (DOC) concentrations and the Na:Cl ratio of soil and stream waters displayed strong seasonal patterns with little seasonal variation observed in soil water pH. These patterns, plus the strong relationships between ANC, Cl and DOC, suggest that cation exchange and seasonal changes in the production of DOC and seasalt deposition are driving a shift in the proportion of acidity attributable to strong acid anions, from atmospheric deposition, during winter to predominantly organic acids in summer.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Geography and Environmental Science
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Earth Systems Science
ID Code:15571
Publisher:Elsevier

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