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Glomus intraradices and Gigaspora margarita arbuscular mycorrhizal associations differentially affect nitrogen and potassium nutrition of Plantago lanceolata in a low fertility dune soil

Veresoglou, S. D., Shaw, E. J. and Sen, R. (2011) Glomus intraradices and Gigaspora margarita arbuscular mycorrhizal associations differentially affect nitrogen and potassium nutrition of Plantago lanceolata in a low fertility dune soil. Plant and Soil, 340 (1-2). pp. 481-490. ISSN 0032-079X

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1007/s11104-010-0619-4

Abstract/Summary

Two controlled microcosm experiments aimed at a critical re-assessment of the contributions of divergent arbuscular mycorrhizal (AM) fungi to plant mineral nutrition were established that specifically targeted Plantago lanceolata–Glomus intraradices (B.B/E) and –Gigaspora margarita (BEG 34) symbioses developed in a native, nutrient limited, coastal dune soil. Plant tissue nitrogen (N), phosphorus (P) and potassium (K) status as well as plant growth parameters and levels of mycorrhizal colonization were assessed at harvest. In addition to the general well-established mycorrhizal facilitation of P uptake, the study was able to demonstrate a G. intraradices-specific contribution to improved plant nitrogen and potassium nutrition. In the two respective experiments, G. intraradices-inoculated plants had 27.8% and 40.8% more total N and 55.8% and 23.3% more total K when compared to Gi. margarita inoculated counterparts. Dissimilar overall contribution of the two isolates to plant nutrition was identified in AM-genus specific differences in plant tissue N:P:K ratios. G. intraradices inoculated and non-mycorrhizal plants generally exhibited N:P:K ratios indicative of P limitation whereas for Gi.margarita mycorrhizal plants, corresponding ratios strongly implied either N or K limitation. The study provides further evidence highlighting AM functional biodiversity in respect to plant nutrient limitation experienced by mycorrhizal P. lanceolata in an ecologically relevant soil system.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Geography and Environmental Science
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Soil Research Centre
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Earth Systems Science
ID Code:17243
Uncontrolled Keywords:Plant mineral nutrition – N:P:K ratio – Coastal dune soil – Glomeromycota – Plant nutrient limitation
Additional Information:From the issue entitled "Special Issue: Steppe ecosystems and climate and land use changes—vulnerability, feedbacks and possibilities for adaptation"
Publisher:Springer

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