Accessibility navigation


Out of the ivory tower: the impact of wider social contact on the values, religious beliefs and identities of Chinese postgraduate students in the UK

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

Li, D. (2012) Out of the ivory tower: the impact of wider social contact on the values, religious beliefs and identities of Chinese postgraduate students in the UK. Race, Ethnicity and Education, 12 (2). pp. 241-258. ISSN 1470-109X

[img] Text - Accepted Version
· Restricted to Repository staff only
· Please see our End User Agreement before downloading.

107Kb
[img] Text - Accepted Version
· Please see our End User Agreement before downloading.

197Kb

To link to this article DOI: 10.1080/13613324.2011.585339

Abstract/Summary

This article explores the impact of wider social contact on the experience of Chinese postgraduate students of adaptation to life in the UK. Focus group and individual interviews were conducted with a group of 11 Chinese students on an MA programme at a university in southern England and individual interviews with three representatives of a local volunteer group (LVG) offering support to the Chinese students. Although it was perceived that the students’ support needs were not adequately met by the University, the additional support offered outside the University was unanimously valued and considered as enriching their cultural and linguistic experiences and meeting their expectations. However, frequent social contact with the LVG, whose members were mostly Christians, also had an impact on their values, religious beliefs and identities. In a discussion framed within the sociological perspective of proselytization or religious conversion and the broad framework of international education and globalization, the different responses to this contact are described in terms of believers, doubters, empathisers and commentators. Implications are considered for universities, people involved in providing social support for international students, and sponsors of international students.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > Institute of Education > Language and Literacy > Second Language Research Group
ID Code:20710
Uncontrolled Keywords:Chinese students; adaptation; identities; religious beliefs; proselytization
Publisher:Taylor & Francis

Download Statistics for this item.

Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation