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Diallyl disulphide, a beneficial component of garlic oil, causes a redistribution of cell-cycle growth phases, induces apoptosis and enhances butyrate-induced apoptosis in colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29)

Altonsy, M. O. and Andrews, S. C. (2011) Diallyl disulphide, a beneficial component of garlic oil, causes a redistribution of cell-cycle growth phases, induces apoptosis and enhances butyrate-induced apoptosis in colorectal adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29). Nutrition and Cancer, 63 (7). pp. 1104-1113. ISSN 1532-7914

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1080/01635581.2011.601846

Abstract/Summary

Colon cancer is a leading and expanding cause of death worldwide. A major contributory factor to this disease is diet composition; some components are beneficial (e.g. dietary fibre) whilst others are detrimental (e.g. alcohol). Garlic oil is a prominent dietary constituent that prevents the development of colorectal cancer. This effect is believed to be mainly due to diallyl disulphide (DADS), which selectively induces redox stress in cancerous (rather than normal) cells which leads to apoptotic cell death. However, the detailed mechanism by which DADS causes apoptosis remains unclear. We show that DADS-treatment of colonic adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29) initiates a cascade of molecular events characteristic of apoptosis. These include a decrease in cellular proliferation, translocation of phosphatidylserine to the plasma-membrane outer-layer, activation of caspase-3, genomic-DNA fragmentation and G2/M phase cell-cycle arrest. Short-chain fatty acids (SCFAs), particularly butyrate (abundantly produced in the gut by bacterial fermentation of dietary polysaccharides), enhance colonic cell integrity but, in contrast, inhibit colonic-cancer cell growth. Combining DADS with butyrate augmented the effect of butyrate on HT-29 cells. These results suggest that the anti-cancerous properties of DADS afford greater benefit when supplied with other favourable dietary factors (SCFA/polysaccharides) that likewise reduce colonic tumour development.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences > Biomedical Sciences
ID Code:22277
Publisher:Routledge

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