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Manipulation and articulation: population statistics in 19th century France and England

Schweber, L. (2001) Manipulation and articulation: population statistics in 19th century France and England. Social Research: an International Quarterly, 68 (2).

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Abstract/Summary

The article presents an essay that deals with the study conducted by Donald MacKenzie and the case studies comparing the use of population statistics in France and Great Britain in the periods of 1825 and 1885. It analyzes Donald MacKenzie's study on the ways professional and political commitments informed the choice of statistical indexes in the British statistical community. Furthermore, the author is interested in knowing how this influenced the development of mathematical statistics in Great Britain. The author concludes that the differences in the debates over population statistics are accounted to the differences in the social and epistemological logics of population statistics.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Construction Management and Engineering > Business Innovation in Construction
Faculty of Science > School of Construction Management and Engineering > Transition Pathways to a Low-Carbon Economy
ID Code:27462
Publisher:The New School for Social Research

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