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The trees and the bees: using enforcement and income projects to protect forests and rural livelihoods through spatial joint production

Albers , H. J. and Robinson, E. J. Z. (2011) The trees and the bees: using enforcement and income projects to protect forests and rural livelihoods through spatial joint production. Agricultural and Resource Economics Review, 40 (3). pp. 424-438.

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Official URL: http://purl.umn.edu/120271

Abstract/Summary

Forest managers in developing countries enforce extraction restrictions to limit forest degradation. In response, villagers may displace some of their extraction to other forests, which generates “leakage” of degradation. Managers also implement poverty alleviation projects to compensate for lost resource access or to induce conservation. We develop a model of spatial joint production of bees and fuelwood that is based on forest-compatible projects such as beekeeping in Thailand, Tanzania, and Mexico. We demonstrate that managers can better determine the amount and pattern of degradation by choosing the location of both enforcement and the forest-based activity.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Economic and Social Sciences Division > Food Economics and Marketing (FEM)
ID Code:27513
Uncontrolled Keywords:leakage, spatial, NTFPs, forest conservation, livelihoods, forest degradation
Publisher:Northeastern Agricultural and Resource Economics Association

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