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Variation in the sensitivity of Callosobruchus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) acetylcholinesterase to the organophosphate insecticide malaoxon: effect of species, geographical strain and food type

Gbaye, O. A., Holloway, G. J. and Callaghan, A. (2012) Variation in the sensitivity of Callosobruchus (Coleoptera: Bruchidae) acetylcholinesterase to the organophosphate insecticide malaoxon: effect of species, geographical strain and food type. Pest Management Science, 68 (9). pp. 1265-1271. ISSN 1526-4998

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1002/ps.3293

Abstract/Summary

BACKGROUND: Bruchid beetles, Callosobruchus species, are serious pests of economically important grain legumes; their activity in stores is often controlled by use of synthetic insecticides. Esterases are known to be involved in insecticide resistance in insects. However, there is dearth of information on esterase activity in the genus Callosobruchus. In this study we investigated the effect of species, geographical strain and food type on the variation of acetylcholinesterase (AChE) activity and its inhibition by malaoxon (malathion metabolite) using an in vitro spectrophotometric method. RESULT: AChE activity varied significantly among species and strains and also among legume type used for rearing them. Generally irrespective of species, strain or food type, the higher the AChE activity of a population, the higher its inhibition by malaoxon. C. chinensis had the highest AChE activity of the species studied and in the presence of malaoxon it had the lowest remaining AChE activity, while C. rhodesianus retained the highest activity. CONCLUSION: A firsthand knowledge of AChE activity in regional Callosobruchus in line with the prevailing food types should be of utmost importance to grain legume breeders, researchers on plant materials for bruchid control and pesticide manufacturer/applicators for a robust integrated management of these bruchids.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Biological Sciences > Environmental Biology
ID Code:27966
Publisher:Wiley

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