Accessibility navigation


"You can see some eagles. And hear the trumpets": the literary and political hinterland of T.S. Eliot's 'Coriolan'

Matthews, S. (2013) "You can see some eagles. And hear the trumpets": the literary and political hinterland of T.S. Eliot's 'Coriolan'. Journal of Modern Literature, 36 (2). pp. 44-60. ISSN 1529-1464

Full text not archived in this repository.

It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work. See Guidance on citing.

Abstract/Summary

There has been an increased amount of scholarly interest lately in T.S. Eliot's unfinished sequence, Coriolan (1932)—interest drawn from its Shakespearian allusiveness, and from analysis of this writing's particularly rebarbative, jarring poetic. Although, however, the two parts of the sequence published by Eliot are acknowledged as being his nearest approach to poetic commentary upon contemporary political ideas, little criticism exists establishing the hinterland of the political thought, with which Eliot was most familiar, as editor of the Criterion. Coriolan emerges at a time when the lure of fascism pulled hardest at Eliot's sensibility. This article reviews the full political context provided by Eliot's journal, as well as considering the connections between that political engagement and the readings of Shakespeare he was also promulgating through this forum, in order to provide a more complex sense than hitherto of the diverse pressures underlying the unsettled nature of the existing Coriolan poems.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > Language Text and Power
ID Code:30851
Uncontrolled Keywords:T.S. Eliot, Politics, The Criterion, Shakespeare, Coriolan
Publisher:Indiana University Press

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation