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Wanted dead and alive : to what extent are hunting and protection of an endangered species compatible?

Robinson, E. J.Z. (2008) Wanted dead and alive : to what extent are hunting and protection of an endangered species compatible? Environment and Development Economics, 13 (5). pp. 607-620. ISSN 1355-770X

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1017/S1355770X08004403

Abstract/Summary

Cash-constrained wildlife departments must increasingly look towards revenue-generating activities such as sales of permits for hunting common species combined with fines for those caught with rare species. Pertinent to west Africa, an optimal enforcement model demonstrates the conditions under which a department with neither external budget nor tourism revenue can fully protect a rare species, and the impact on other species and local hunters' livelihoods. The department's effectiveness is shown to depend critically on the extent to which hunters can discriminate among different species. Improvements in hunting technology selectivity are therefore a substitute for increased enforcement spending.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:No Reading authors. Back catalogue items
Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Economic and Social Sciences Division > Food Economics and Marketing (FEM)
ID Code:31586

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