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W(h)ither phonological awareness? Literate trainee teachers’ lack of stable knowledge about the sound structure of words

Stainthorp, R. (2004) W(h)ither phonological awareness? Literate trainee teachers’ lack of stable knowledge about the sound structure of words. Educational Psychology, 24 (6). pp. 753-766. ISSN 0144-3410

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1080/0144341042000271728

Abstract/Summary

Recent national developments in the teaching of literacy in the early years in the UK mean that teachers need to have explicit fluent knowledge of the sound structure of the language and its relationship to orthography in order to teach reading effectively. In this study, a group of 38 graduate trainee primary teachers were given a pencil and paper test of phonological awareness as part of a course on teaching literacy. Results from the pencil and paper test were used as the basis of teaching about the sound structure of words. The test was repeated six months later. The results showed that they did not use a consistent system for segmenting words into component sounds. Though there was substantial improvement on second testing, many trainees still did not show evidence that they had yet developed sufficient insights into the sound structure of words to be able to teach children about phonemes with certainty. It is argued that student teachers need substantial explicit training and practice in manipulating the sound structure of words to enable them to teach this aspect of language confidently.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > Institute of Education > Language and Literacy in Education
ID Code:31738
Publisher:Taylor & Francis

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