Accessibility navigation


Characterising the energy performance of centralised HVAC&R systems in the UK

Shahrestani, M., Yao, R. and Cook, G. (2013) Characterising the energy performance of centralised HVAC&R systems in the UK. Energy and Buildings, 62. pp. 239-247. ISSN 0378-7788

[img]
Preview
Text - Accepted Version
· Please see our End User Agreement before downloading.

516kB

It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work. See Guidance on citing.

To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.enbuild.2013.03.016

Abstract/Summary

Heating, ventilation, air conditioning and refrigeration (HVAC&R) systems account for more than 60% of the energy consumption of buildings in the UK. However, the effect of the variety of HVAC&R systems on building energy performance has not yet been taken into account within the existing building energy benchmarks. In addition, the existing building energy benchmarks are not able to assist decision-makers with HVAC&R system selection. This study attempts to overcome these two deficiencies through the performance characterisation of 36 HVAC&R systems based on the simultaneous dynamic simulation of a building and a variety of HVAC&R systems using TRNSYS software. To characterise the performance of HVAC&R systems, four criteria are considered; energy consumption, CO2 emissions, thermal comfort and indoor air quality. The results of the simulations show that, all the studied systems are able to provide an acceptable level of indoor air quality and thermal comfort. However, the energy consumption and amount of CO2 emissions vary. One of the significant outcomes of this study reveals that combined heating, cooling and power systems (CCHP) have the highest energy consumption with the lowest energy related CO2 emissions among the studied HVAC&R systems.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of the Built Environment > Construction Management and Engineering > Innovative and Sustainable Technologies
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Energy Research
ID Code:31924
Publisher:Elsevier

Downloads

Downloads per month over past year

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation