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Variation in root-associated phosphatase activities in wheat contributes to the utilization of organic P substrates in vitro, but does not explain differences in the P-nutrition of plants when grown in soils

George, T. S., Gregory, P. J., Hocking, P. and Richardson, A. E. (2008) Variation in root-associated phosphatase activities in wheat contributes to the utilization of organic P substrates in vitro, but does not explain differences in the P-nutrition of plants when grown in soils. Environmental and Experimental Botany, 64 (3). pp. 239-249. ISSN 0098-8472

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.envexpbot.2008.05.002

Abstract/Summary

To understand whether genotypic variation in root-associated phosphatase activities in wheat impacts on its ability to acquire phosphorus (P), various phosphatase activities of roots were measured in relation to the utilization of organic P substrates in agar, and the P-nutrition of plants was investigated in a range of soils. Root-associated phosphatase activities of plants grown in hydroponics were measured against different organic P substrates. Representative genotypes were then grown in both agar culture and in soils with differing organic P contents and plant biomass and P uptake were determined. Differences in the activities of both root-associated and exuded phosphodiesterase and phosphomonoesterase were observed, and were related to the P content of plants supplied with either ribonucleic acid or glucose 6-phosphate, respectively, as the sole form of P. When the cereal lines were grown in different soils, however, there was little relationship between any root-associated phosphatase activity and plant P uptake. This indicates that despite differences in phosphatase activities of cereal roots, such variability appears to play no significant role in the P-nutrition of the plant grown in soil, and that any benefit derived from the hydrolysis of soil organic P is common to all genotypes.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Biodiversity, Crops and Agroecosystems Division > Crops Research Group
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Soil Research Centre
ID Code:32017
Uncontrolled Keywords:Glucose-6-phosphate, myo-Inositol hexakisphosphate,RNA, Phytate, Phosphomonoester, Phosphodiester,Rhizosphere, Root exudates
Publisher:Elsevier

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