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Comparison of subcellular partitioning, distribution, and internal speciation of Cu between Cu-tolerant and naive populations of Dendrodrilus rubidus Savigny

Arnold, B. E., Hodson, M. E., Charnock, J. and Peijnenburg, W. (2008) Comparison of subcellular partitioning, distribution, and internal speciation of Cu between Cu-tolerant and naive populations of Dendrodrilus rubidus Savigny. Environmental Science & Technology, 42 (10). pp. 3900-3905. ISSN 0013-936X

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1021/es800172g

Abstract/Summary

When considering contaminated site ecology and ecological risk assessment a key question is whether organisms that appear unaffected by accumulation of contaminants are tolerant or resistant to those contaminants. A population of Dendrodrilus rubidus Savigny earthworms from the Coniston Copper Mines, an area of former Cu mining, exhibit increased tolerance and accumulation of Cu relative to a nearby non-Cu exposed population. Distribution of total Cu between different body parts (posterior, anterior, body wall) of the two populations was determined after a 14 day exposure to 250 mg Cu kg(-1) in Cu-amended soil. Cu concentrations were greater in Coniston earthworms but relative proportions of Cu in different body parts were the same between populations. Cu speciation was determined using extended X-ray absorption fine structure spectroscopy (EXAFS). Cu was coordinated to 0 atoms in the exposure soil but to S atoms in the earthworms. There was no difference in this speciation between the different earthworm populations. In another experiment earthworms were exposed to a range of Cu concentrations (200-700 mg Cu kg(-1)). Subcellular partitioning of accumulated Cu was determined. Coniston earthworms accumulated more Cu but relative proportions of Cu in the different fractions (cytosol > granular > tissue fragments, cell membranes, and intact cells) were the same between populations. Results suggest that Coniston D. rubidus are able to survive in the Cu-rich Coniston Copper Mines soil through enlargement of the same Cu storage reservoirs that exist in a nearby non-Cu exposed population.

Item Type:Article
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Geography and Environmental Science
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Earth Systems Science
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Soil Research Centre
ID Code:3203
Uncontrolled Keywords:EARTHWORM EISENIA-FOETIDA LUMBRICUS-RUBELLUS INTRACELLULAR COMPARTMENTATION APORRECTODEA-CALIGINOSA NEUTRON-DIFFRACTION DENDROBAENA-RUBIDA TOXICITY TEST COPPER SOIL METALLOTHIONEIN
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