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Complexation of copper by sewage sludge-derived dissolved organic matter: Effects on soil sorption behaviour and plant uptake

Ashworth, D. J. and Alloway, B. J. (2007) Complexation of copper by sewage sludge-derived dissolved organic matter: Effects on soil sorption behaviour and plant uptake. Water Air and Soil Pollution, 182 (1-4). pp. 187-196. ISSN 0049-6979

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1007/s11270-006-9331-7

Abstract/Summary

The complexation of Cu by sewage sludge-derived dissolved organic matter (SSDOM) is a process by which the environmental significance of the element may become enhanced due to reduced soil sorption and, hence, increased mobility. The work described in this paper used an ion selective electrode procedure to show that SSDOM complexation of Cu was greatest at intermediate pH values because competition between hydrogen ions and Cu for SSDOM binding sites, and between hydroxyl ions and SSDOM as Cu ligands, was lowest at such values. Batch sorption experiments further showed that the process of Cu complexation by SSDOM provided an explanation for enhanced desorption of Cu from the solid phase of a contaminated, organic matter-rich, clay loam soil, and reduced adsorption of Cu onto the solid phase of a sandy loam soil. Complexation of Cu by SSDOM did not affect uptake of Cu by spring barley plants, when compared to free ionic Cu, in a sand-culture pot experiment. However, it did appear to lead to greater biomass yields of the plant; perhaps indicating that the Cu-SSDOM complex had a lower toxicity towards the plant than the free Cu ion.

Item Type:Article
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Soil Research Centre
ID Code:3211
Uncontrolled Keywords:Cu DOC DOM free ion heavy metals speciation spring barley AMENDED SOILS MOBILITY CARBON NICKEL ZINC BIOAVAILABILITY SPECIATION FRACTIONS TOXICITY WATERS
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