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Electricity use in the commercial kitchen

Mudie, S., Essah, E. A., Grandison, A. and Felgate, R. (2013) Electricity use in the commercial kitchen. In: APEC conference on low carbon towns and energy storage, 25-26 May 2013, Changsha, China.

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Abstract/Summary

Academic and industrial literature concerning the energy consumption of commercial kitchens is scarce. Electricity consumption data were collected from distribution board current transformers in a sample of fourteen UK public house restaurants. This was set up to identify patterns of appliance use as well as to assess the total energy consumption of these establishments. The electricity consumption in the selected commercial kitchens was significantly higher than current literature estimates. On average, 63% of the premises electricity consumption was attributed to the catering activity. Key appliances that contributed to the samples average electricity consumption were identified as refrigeration (70 kwh, 41%), fryers (11 kwh, 13%), combi-ovens (35 kwh, 12%) bain maries (27 kwh, 9%) and grills (37kwh, 12%). Behavioral factors and poor maintenance were identified as major contributors to excessive electricity usage with potential savings of 70% and 45% respectively. Initiatives are required to influence operator behavior, such as the expansion of mandatory energy labeling, improved feedback information and the use of behavior change campaigns. Strict maintenance protocols and more appropriate sizing of refrigeration would be of great benefit to energy reduction.

Item Type:Conference or Workshop Item (Paper)
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of the Built Environment > Construction Management and Engineering > Innovative and Sustainable Technologies
ID Code:33045

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