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Is there sufficient 'sink' in current bioaccessibility determinations of organic pollutants in soils?

Collins, C. D., Mosquera-Vazquez, M., Gomez-Eyles, J. L., Mayer, P., Gouliarmou, V. and Blum, F. (2013) Is there sufficient 'sink' in current bioaccessibility determinations of organic pollutants in soils? Environmental Pollution, 181. pp. 128-132. ISSN 0269-7491

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.envpol.2013.05.053

Abstract/Summary

Bioaccessibility tests can be used to improve contaminated land risk assessments. For organic pollutants a ‘sink’ is required within these tests to better mimic their desorption under the physiological conditions prevailing in the intestinal tract, where a steep diffusion gradient for the removal of organic pollutants from the soil matrix would exist. This is currently ignored in most PBET systems. By combining the CEPBET bioaccessibility test with an infinite sink, the removal of PAH from spiked solutions was monitored. Less than 10% of spiked PAH remained in the stomach media after 1 h, 10% by 4 h in the small intestine compartment and c.15% after 16 h in the colon. The addition of the infinite sink increased bioaccessibility estimates for field soils by a factor of 1.2–2.8, confirming its importance for robust PBET tests. TOC or BC were not the only factors controlling desorption of the PAH from the soils.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Earth Systems Science
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Geography and Environmental Science
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Soil Research Centre
ID Code:33303
Publisher:Elsevier

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