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Dust production and the release of iron oxides resulting from the aeolian abrasion of natural dune sands

Bullard, J. E. and White, K. (2005) Dust production and the release of iron oxides resulting from the aeolian abrasion of natural dune sands. Earth Surface Processes and Landforms, 30 (1). pp. 95-106. ISSN 0197-9337

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1002/esp.1148

Abstract/Summary

Global dust trajectories indicate that significant quantities of aeolian-transported iron oxides originate in contemporary dryland areas. One potential source is the iron-rich clay coatings that characterize many sand-sized particles in desert dunefields. This paper uses laboratory experiments to determine the rate at which these coatings can be removed from dune sands by aeolian abrasion. The coatings impart a red colour to the grains to which previous researchers have assigned variable geomorphological significance. The quantities or iron removed during a 120 hour abrasion experiment are small (99 mg kg(-1)) and difficult to detect by eye; however, high resolution spectroscopy clearly indicates that ferric oxides are released during abrasion and the reflectance of the particles alters. One of the products of aeolian abrasion is fine particles (<10 mum diameter) with the potential for long distance transport. Copyright (C) 2004 John Wiley Sons, Ltd.

Item Type:Article
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Geography and Environmental Science
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Earth Systems Science
ID Code:3333
Uncontrolled Keywords:aeolian abrasion iron oxides high resolution spectroscopy fine particle production REFLECTANCE SPECTROSCOPY VISIBLE SPECTROSCOPY SIMPSON DESERT AUSTRALIA COLOR TRANSPORT GOETHITE HEMATITE ORIGIN PARTICLES
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