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Plant uptake of non-ionic organic chemicals

Collins, C.D., Fryer, M. and Grosso, A. (2006) Plant uptake of non-ionic organic chemicals. Environmental Science and Technology, 40 (1). pp. 45-52. ISSN 0013-936X

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1021/es0508166

Abstract/Summary

Plant uptake of organic chemicals is an important process when considering the risks associated with land contamination, the role of vegetation in the global cycling of persistent organic pollutants, and the potential for industrial discharges to contaminate the food chain. There have been some significant advances in our understanding of the processes of plant uptake of organic chemicals in recent years; most notably there is now a better understanding of the air to plant transfer pathway, which may be significant for a number of industrial chemicals. This review identifies the key processes involved in the plant uptake of organic chemicals including those for which there is currently little information, e.g., plant lipid content and plant metabolism. One of the principal findings is that although a number of predictive models exist using established relationships, these require further validation if they are to be considered sufficiently robust for the purposes of contaminated land risk assessment or for prediction of the global cycling of persistent organic pollutants. Finally, a number of processes are identified which should be the focus of future research

Item Type:Article
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Geography and Environmental Science
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Earth Systems Science
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Soil Research Centre
ID Code:3410
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