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Shifting Shores: managing landscape challenge and change on the Lizard Peninsula, Cornwall

Geoghegan, H. and Leyshon, C. S. (2012) Shifting Shores: managing landscape challenge and change on the Lizard Peninsula, Cornwall. Landscape Research, 39 (6). pp. 631-646. ISSN 1469-9710

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1080/01426397.2012.697137

Abstract/Summary

In this paper, we look at how landscape and climate change are simultaneously apprehended through institutional strategies and then negotiated through local knowledge and social relations on the ground. We argue that by examining landscapes that are practised, embodied and lived, it is possible to gain an understanding of people's actions, beliefs and values in relation to climate and climate change. This attention to cultural landscapes also enables us to ask how a variety of publics make sense of climate change, and how they are invited to do so by organisations that take responsibility for the management and preservation of landscape, such as the National Trust, Europe's biggest conservation organisation. This paper considers how the Trust makes sense of climate change via the document Shifting Shores and how its strategies are operationalised on the Lizard Peninsula, Cornwall, UK.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:No Reading authors. Back catalogue items
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Human Environments
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Geography and Environmental Science
ID Code:34225
Uncontrolled Keywords:landscape, climate change, conservation, cultural geography, National Trust
Publisher:Taylor & Francis

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