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Evolution of the modern Nile delta promontories: development of accretional features during shoreline retreat

Frihy, O. and Lawrence, D. (2004) Evolution of the modern Nile delta promontories: development of accretional features during shoreline retreat. Environmental Geology, 46 (6-7). pp. 914-931. ISSN 0943-0105

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1007/s00254-004-1103-3

Abstract/Summary

The active accretional features that have developed along the modern Nile Delta promontories during shoreline retreat are analysed using topographic maps, remote imagery, ground and hydrographic surveys, together providing 15 time-slice maps (1922-2000) at Rosetta and 14 time-slice maps (1909-2000) at Damietta. Small double sandy spits developed and persisted at Rosetta between 1986 and 1991. At Damietta, a much larger single spit, 9 km long, formed approximately east of the mouth of the Damietta Nile branch between 1955 and 1972, although its source has now been depleted. Both the Rosetta and Damietta inlets are associated with submerged mouth bars that accumulated prior to the damming of the Nile, but that continue to contribute to local sedimentation problems, particularly at Rosetta. The development of the active accretional features along the Nile promontories reflects a combination of factors including sediment availability, transport pathways from source areas, a decrease in the magnitude of Nile flood discharges, as well as the impact of protective structures at the river mouths.

Item Type:Article
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science
ID Code:3516
Uncontrolled Keywords:accretional features; Nile delta promontories; shoreline retreat
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