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Embedding arts and humanities in the creative economy: the role of graduates in the UK

Comunian, R., Faggian, A. and Jewell, S. (2014) Embedding arts and humanities in the creative economy: the role of graduates in the UK. Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, 32 (3). pp. 426-450. ISSN 1472-3425

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1068/c11153r

Abstract/Summary

The recent change in funding structure in the UK higher education system has fuelled an animated debate about the role that arts and humanities (A&H) subjects play not only within higher education but more broadly in the society and the economy. The debate has engaged with a variety of arguments and perspectives, from the intrinsic value of A&H, to their contribution to the broader society and their economic impact, particularly in relation to the creative economy, through knowledge exchange activities. The paper argues that in the current debate very little attention has been placed on the role that A&H graduates play in the economy, through their work after graduation, and specifically in the creative economy. Using Higher Education Statistical Agency data, we analyse the performance of A&H graduates (compared with other graduates) and particularly explore how embedded they are with the creative economy and its associated industries. The results highlight a complex intersection of different subdisciplines of the A&H with the creative economy but also reveal the salary gap and unstable working conditions experienced by graduates in this field.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > School of Politics, Economics and International Relations > Economics
ID Code:36160
Publisher:Pion Ltd
Publisher Statement:Comunian, R., Faggian, A. and Jewell, S. (2014). The definitive, peer-reviewed and edited version of this article is published in Environment and Planning C: Government and Policy, 32 (3). pp. 426-450. doi: 10.1068/c11153r

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