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Simulating the Holocene lake-level record of Lake Bysjon, southern Sweden

Vassiljev, J., Harrison, S. P. and Guiot, J. (1998) Simulating the Holocene lake-level record of Lake Bysjon, southern Sweden. Quaternary Research, 49 (1). pp. 62-71. ISSN 0033-5894

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1006/qres.1997.1942

Abstract/Summary

Lake Bysjön, southern Sweden, has experienced major lake-level lowerings during the Holocene, with one interval about 900014C yr B.P. when water level dropped ca. 7 m and the lake became closed. These changes were not solely due to known changes in radiation budgets or seasonal temperatures. Simulations with a lake-catchment model indicate that, given the actual changes in radiation and temperatures, all the observed lake-level lowerings (including the major lowering at 900014C yr B.P.) could have occurred in response to precipitation changes of <75 mm/yr when winter temperatures were warmer than today. In these circumstances, the reduction of runoff into the lake caused by increased evapotranspiration during the late winter and spring, combined with relatively small changes in precipitation, was sufficient for the lake to become closed. When winter temperatures were colder than today, the reduction in winter runoff related to reduced precipitation was only very slight and insufficient to lower the lake below threshold. In such circumstances, changes in outflow were sufficient to compensate for the combined changes in precipitation and runoff, and lake level therefore remained unchanged.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Earth Systems Science
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Geography and Environmental Science
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Past Climate Change
ID Code:36418
Publisher:Elsevier

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