Accessibility navigation


'Context' in Durham, E., 'Symbols of power: The Silchester Bronze Eagle and eagles in Roman Britain'

Fulford, M. (2013) 'Context' in Durham, E., 'Symbols of power: The Silchester Bronze Eagle and eagles in Roman Britain'. Archaeological Journal, 170. pp. 83-86. ISSN 0066-5983

Full text not archived in this repository.

It is advisable to refer to the publisher's version if you intend to cite from this work. See Guidance on citing.

To link to this item DOI: 10.1080/00665983.2013.11021002

Abstract/Summary

Those who study Roman art and religion in Britain will know that there are a relatively small number of pieces in stone and bronze which are regularly used to illustrate arguments on Romanization, provincialism and identity. However, while these objects become familiar through such use, they are, in fact, often little studied as pieces in their own right and the only description of their appearance and context are some fifty or more years old. Re-excavation of the context from which the Silchester eagle was recovered has raised questions about the date of its deposition, as well as its origin and use, and indeed the nature of its deposition at Silchester. This paper examines the figurine in detail, the role of the eagle at Silchester and explores the significance of the eagle more widely in Roman Britain.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Social Archaeology
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Archaeology
ID Code:36763
Publisher:Royal Archaeological Institute

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation