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Temporal sensitivity of rice seed development from spikelet fertility to viable mature seed to extreme-temperature

Martínez-Eixarch, M. and Ellis, R. H. (2015) Temporal sensitivity of rice seed development from spikelet fertility to viable mature seed to extreme-temperature. Crop Science, 55 (1). pp. 354-364. ISSN 0011-183X

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To link to this item DOI: 10.2135/cropsci2014.01.0042

Abstract/Summary

Extreme temperature during reproductive development affects rice (Oryza sativa L.) yield and seed quality. A controlled-environment reciprocal-transfer experiment was designed where plants from two japonica cultivars were grown at 28/24 ⁰C and moved to 18/14 ⁰C and vice versa, or from 28/24 to 38/34 ⁰C and vice versa, for 7-d periods to determine the respective temporal pattern of sensitivity of spikelet fertility, yield, and seed viability to each temperature extreme. Spikelet fertility and seed yield per panicle were severely reduced by extreme temperature in the 14 d period prior to anthesis; and both cultivars were affected at 38/34 ⁰C while only cv. Gleva was affected at 18/14 ºC. The damage was greater the earlier the panicles were stressed within this period. Later-exserted panicles compensated only partly for yield loss. Seed viability was significantly reduced by 7-d exposure to 38/34 ⁰C or 18/14 ⁰C at 1 to 7 and 1 to 14 d after anthesis, respectively, in cv. Gleva. Cultivar Taipei 309 was not affected by 7 d exposure at 18/14 ⁰C; and no consistent temporal pattern of sensitivity was evident at 38/34 ⁰C. Hence, brief exposure to low or high temperature was most damaging to spikelet fertility and yield 14 to 7 d before anthesis, coinciding with microsporogenesis; and it was almost as damaging around anthesis. Seed viability was most vulnerable to low or high temperature in the 7 or 14 d after anthesis, when histodifferentiation occurs.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Life Sciences > School of Agriculture, Policy and Development > Biodiversity, Crops and Agroecosystems Division > Crops Research Group
ID Code:37602
Uncontrolled Keywords:anthesis, climate change, Oryza sativa L. subsp. Japonica, panicle sterility, reproductive development, rice, seed development, seed viability, temperature stress, yield
Publisher:Crop Science Society of America

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