Accessibility navigation


Effects of land management on different forms of soil carbon in olive groves in Mediterranean areas

Fernández-Romero, M. L., Lozano-García, B., Parras-Alcántara, L., Collins, C. D. and Clark, J. M. (2016) Effects of land management on different forms of soil carbon in olive groves in Mediterranean areas. Land Degradation and Development, 27 (4). pp. 1186-1195. ISSN 1085-3278

Full text not archived in this repository.

To link to this item DOI: 10.1002/ldr.2327

Abstract/Summary

This study analyses soil organic carbon (SOC) and hot-water extractable carbon (HWC), both measures of soil quality, under different land management: (1) conventional tillage (CT); (2) CT plus the addition of oil mill waste alperujo (A); (3) CT plus the addition of oil mill waste olive leaves (L); (4) no tillage with chipped pruned branches (NT1); and (5) no tillage with chipped pruned branches and weeds (NT2); in a typical Mediterranean agricultural area; the olive groves of Andalucía, southern Spain. SOC values in CT, A, NT1 and NT2 decreased with depth, but in NT2 the surface horizon (0-5 cm) had higher values than the other treatments, 47% more than the average values in the other three soils. In L, SOC also decreased with depth, although there was an increase of 88.5% from the first (0-10 cm) to the second horizon (10-16 cm). Total SOC stock values were very similar under A (101.9 Mg ha−1), CT (101.7 Mg ha−1), NT1 (105.8 Mg ha−1) and NT2 (111.3 Mg ha−1, if we consider the same depth of the others). However, SOC under L was significantly higher (p < 0.05) at 250.2 Mg ha−1. HWC decreased with depth in A, CT and NT1. NT2 and L followed the same pattern as the other management types but with a higher value in the surface horizon (2.3 and 4.9 mg g−1 respectively). Overall, our results indicate that application of oil mill waste olive leaves under CT (L) is a good management practice to improve SOC and reduce waste.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Earth Systems Science
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Geography and Environmental Science
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Centre for Food Security
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Soil Research Centre
ID Code:37791
Uncontrolled Keywords:soil organic carbon;hot-water extractable carbon;olive grove;land management
Publisher:Wiley Interscience

University Staff: Request a correction | Centaur Editors: Update this record

Page navigation