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Ethnobiology and the evolution of the human mind

Mithen, S. (2006) Ethnobiology and the evolution of the human mind. JOURNAL OF THE ROYAL ANTHROPOLOGICAL INSTITUTE , 12 (S1). S45-S61. ISSN 1359-0987

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1111/j.1467-9655.2006.00272.x

Abstract/Summary

An evolutionary perspective on human thought and behaviour indicates that we should expect to find universal systems of perception, classification, and decision-making regarding the natural world. It is the interaction between these evolved aspects of the human mind, the biodiversity of the natural world, and unique historical, social, and economic contexts within which individuals develop and act that gives rise to cultural diversity. The palaeoanthropological record also indicates that language is a recently evolved phenomenon. This suggests that linguistic approaches in ethnobiology are likely to provide only a partial understanding of how humans perceive, classify, and engage with the natural world.

Item Type:Article
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Archaeology
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Scientific Archaeology
ID Code:3819
Uncontrolled Keywords:PLEISTOCENE HOMO; LANGUAGE; ORIGIN; AGE; SPEECH; FLORES; COLONIZATION; CHIMPANZEES; HYPOTHESIS; INDONESIA
Additional Information: Conference Information: 9th International Congress of Ethnobiology Univ Kent, Canterbury, ENGLAND, JUN, 2004 Royal Anthropol Inst; Wenner Gren Fdn

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