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Artefacts between disciplines: the toothbrush and the axe

Garrow, D. and Shove, E. (2007) Artefacts between disciplines: the toothbrush and the axe. Archaeological Dialogues, 14 (2). pp. 117-155. ISSN 1478-2294

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1017/S1380203807002267

Abstract/Summary

This paper takes the form of a dialogue between an archaeologist and a sociologist. In recent years, interdisciplinary working has become increasingly fashionable within academia. The aim of our exchange was to establish exactly what implications this way of working has for understandings of material culture. Our methodology was simple, involving the ‘archaeological’ and ‘sociological’ analysis of two different objects. In undertaking this work, we hoped to bring about new or different understandings of the objects under scrutiny. The process was indeed successful, but not necessarily in the ways we had expected. Ultimately, it revealed a complex set of questions about how the materials of culture are conceptualized and understood, and led us to a renewed appreciation of the theoretical and methodological qualities of what we do within our respective disciplines

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:No Reading authors. Back catalogue items
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Social Archaeology
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Archaeology
ID Code:38288
Uncontrolled Keywords:interdisciplinary working; material culture; archaeology; sociology; toothbrush; axe
Publisher:Cambridge University Press

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