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English Contract Law and the Great War: the development of a doctrine of frustration

MacMillan, C. (2014) English Contract Law and the Great War: the development of a doctrine of frustration. Comparative Legal History, 2 (2). pp. 278-302. ISSN 2049-677X

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To link to this item DOI: 10.5235/2049677X.2.2.278

Abstract/Summary

This article examines changes that occurred in English contract law as a result of the demands made upon Great Britain by the Great War. The focus is on the development of the doctrine of frustration in English law. In particular, it is argued that the development of the doctrine of frustration was fashioned from internal legal forces in the form of both existing case law and emergency legislation in response to the demands placed upon the nation by a global war. The way in which the doctrine of frustration developed during the Great War arose as a direct result of the way in which Britain chose to meet the logistical demands created by the way it fought the Great War.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > School of Law
ID Code:39003
Publisher:Hart Publishing

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