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Moving towards a more mechanistic approach in the determination of soil heat flux from remote measurements - II. Diurnal shape of soil heat flux

Murray, T. and Verhoef, A. (2007) Moving towards a more mechanistic approach in the determination of soil heat flux from remote measurements - II. Diurnal shape of soil heat flux. Agricultural and Forest Meteorology, 147 (1-2). pp. 88-97. ISSN 0168-1923

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To link to this article DOI: 10.1016/j.agrformet.2007.06.009

Abstract/Summary

For vegetated surfaces, calculation of soil heat flux, G, with the Exact or Analytical method requires a harmonic analysis of below-canopy soil surface temperature, to obtain the shape of the diurnal course of G. When determining G with remote sensing methods, only composite (vegetation plus soil) radiometric brightness temperature is available. This paper presents a simple equation that relates the sum of the harmonic terms derived for the composite radiometric surface temperature to that of belowcanopy soil surface temperature. The thermal inertia, Gamma(,) for which a simple equation has been presented in a companion paper, paper I, is used to set the magnitude of G. To assess the success of the method proposed in this paper for the estimation of the diurnal shape of G, a comparison was made between 'remote' and in situ calculated values from described field sites. This indicated that the proposed method was suitable for the estimation of the shape of G for a variety of vegetation types and densities. The approach outlined in paper I, to obtain Gamma, was then combined with the estimated harmonic terms to predict estimates of G, which were compared to values predicted by empirical remote methods found in the literature. This indicated that the method proposed in the combination of papers I and II gave reliable estimates of G, which, in comparison to the other methods, resulted in more realistic predictions for vegetated surfaces. This set of equations can also be used for bare and sparsely vegetated soils, making it a universally applicable method. (C) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

Item Type:Article
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Geography and Environmental Science
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Earth Systems Science
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Soil Research Centre
ID Code:3904
Uncontrolled Keywords:energy balance soil heat flux thermal inertia remote sensing SURFACE-TEMPERATURE MODEL
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