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Social citizenship, housing wealth and the cost of social care: is the Care Act 2014 'Fair'?

Hopkins, N. and Laurie, E. (2015) Social citizenship, housing wealth and the cost of social care: is the Care Act 2014 'Fair'? Modern Law Review, 78 (1). pp. 112-139. ISSN 0026-7961

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1111/1468-2230.12108

Abstract/Summary

This article assesses the extent to which it is ‘fair’ for the government to require owner-occupiers to draw on the equity accumulated in their home to fund their social care costs. The question is stimulated by the report of the Commission on Funding of Care and Support, Fairer Care Funding (the Dilnot Commission) and the subsequent Care Act 2014. The enquiry is located within the framework of social citizenship and the new social contract. It argues that the individualistic, contractarian approach, exemplified by the Dilnot Commission and reflected in the Act, raises questions when considered from the perspective of intergenerational fairness. We argue that our concerns with the Act could be addressed by inculcating an expectation of drawing on housing wealth to fund older age: a policy of asset-based welfare.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Arts, Humanities and Social Science > School of Law
ID Code:39090
Publisher:Wiley

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