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The forms of bioavailability of phosphorus in integrated vertical flow constructed wetland with earthworms and different substrates

Xu, D., Wang, L., Huili, L., Howard, A., Guan, Y., Jiuhai, L. and Hui, X. (2015) The forms of bioavailability of phosphorus in integrated vertical flow constructed wetland with earthworms and different substrates. Chemosphere, 134. pp. 492-498. ISSN 0045-6535

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1016/j.chemosphere.2015.04.099

Abstract/Summary

A sequential extraction method was utilized to analyze seven forms of P in an integrated vertical-flow constructed wetland (IVFCW) containing earthworms and different substrates. The aluminum-bound P (Al-P) content was found to be lower, and the occluded P (Oc-P) content was higher in the IVFCW. The addition of earthworms into the influent chamber of IVFCW increased the exchange P (Ex-P), iron-bound P (Fe-P), calcium bound P (Ca-P), Oc-P, detritus-bound (De-P) and organic P (Org-P) content in the influent chamber, and also enhanced P content uptake by wetland plants. A significantly positive correlation between P content of above-ground wetland plants and the Ex-P, Fe-P, Oc-P and Org-P content in the rhizosphere was found (P < 0.05), which indicated that the Ex-P, Fe-P, Oc-P and Org-P could be bio-available P. The Ex-P, Fe-P, De-P, Oc-P and Ca-P content of the influent chamber was higher where the substrate contained a mixture of Qing sand and river sand rather than only river sand. Also the IVFCW with earthworms and both Qing sand and river sand had a higher removal efficiency of P, which was related to higher P content uptake by wetland plants and P retained in IVFCW. These findings suggest that addition of earthworms in IVFCW increases the bioavailable P content, resulting in enhanced P content uptake by wetland plants.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Earth Systems Science
Faculty of Science > School of Archaeology, Geography and Environmental Science > Department of Geography and Environmental Science
ID Code:40498
Publisher:Elsevier

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