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Peak residential electricity demand and social practices: deriving flexibility and greenhouse gas intensities from time use and locational data

Torriti, J., Hanna, R., Anderson, B., Yeboah, G. and Druckman, A. (2015) Peak residential electricity demand and social practices: deriving flexibility and greenhouse gas intensities from time use and locational data. Indoor and Built Environment, 24 (7). pp. 891-912. ISSN 1420-326X

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To link to this item DOI: 10.1177/1420326X15600776

Abstract/Summary

Peak residential electricity demand takes place when people conduct simultaneous activities at specific times of the day. Social practices generate patterns of demand and can help understand why, where, with whom and when energy services are used at peak time. The aim of this work is to make use of recent UK time use and locational data to better understand: (i) how a set of component indices on synchronisation, variation, sharing and mobility indicate flexibility to shift demand; and (ii) the links between people’s activities and peaks in greenhouse gases’ intensities. The analysis is based on a recent UK time use dataset, providing 1 minute interval data from GPS devices and 10 minute data from diaries and questionnaires for 175 data days comprising 153 respondents. Findings show how greenhouse gases’ intensities and flexibility to shift activities vary throughout the day. Morning peaks are characterised by high levels of synchronisation, shared activities and occupancy, with low variation of activities. Evening peaks feature low synchronisation, and high spatial mobility variation of activities. From a network operator perspective, the results indicate that periods with lower flexibility may be prone to more significant local network loads due to the synchronization of electricity-demanding activities.

Item Type:Article
Refereed:Yes
Divisions:Faculty of Science > School of the Built Environment > Construction Management and Engineering > Innovative and Sustainable Technologies
Interdisciplinary centres and themes > Energy Research
ID Code:40666
Uncontrolled Keywords:Demand Side Response; Load shifting; Peak demand; Residential electricity demand; Time-use
Publisher:SAGE Publications

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